Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

AS.070.207 - Resilience and its Critics: Change in Environment and Society

Resilience – the idea that environmental systems and social forms can be designed to “bounce back” from disasters and other disruptive changes – has influenced a rapidly growing range of sustainability policies, urban planning strategies, and academic disciplines. In some areas, though, the term signifies neoliberal reform and a shrinking state. This course will trace debates over the many practical and theoretical meanings of resilience, from its origins in military planning and security to its ambivalent connotations for climate change science and disaster preparedness.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ozden-schilling, Thomas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.209 - Urban CItizenship in Latin America

Latin American cities are among the largest in the world, but also among the most unequal. Significant proportions of the urban populations reside informally on the fringes of metropolitan areas without access to services or amenities, secure tenure, or adequate sanitary conditions. This course will study several ethnographies to examine the intricacies of the notion of "urban citizenship” and how the "right to the city" has been imagined, demanded and struggled for in Latin American cities. Cases will include Sao Paulo in Brazil, El Alto in Bolivia, or Bogota in Colombia.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.070.299 - From Palestine to the Pipeline: Land, Property, and Indigenous Politics

What are the ideas, histories, and forces that set the conditions of possibility and foreclosure of indigenous politics today? We will explore this question through then lens of property through readings from anthropology, political theory, history, and geography. As is well known, control over land (and its resources) has historically constituted the core of the struggle between settler and native. Within settler colonies, however, land is governed and regulated as property by the settler state. As such, the imagining, making, regulating, and exchanging of property all have important implications for indigenous territory and sovereignty. Focusing on North America, Australia, and Israel/Palestine, this course considers the following questions: how did ideas about rights and ownership develop in settler colonies in relation to the native inhabitants? How did these ideas shape market relations, regulations, and property law? And how does indigenous land struggle navigate the constraints and possibilities of property in the struggle for territory?

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kohlbry, Paul Andrew
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.214 - Politics and Poetics of Mobility in Africa

This course considers a broad survey of contemporary themes in African mobility, displacement, and re-settlement. Drawing on historical, anthropological, and literary texts and film, the course uses mobility as a window into a range of topics that are of scholarly interest in contemporary African studies: from urbanization and labor, to violence, political subjectivity and the changing nature of the state, formal and informal economy, gender and domesticity, and religious movements.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: McGlennen, Emma Elizabeth
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Open

AS.070.113 - Freshman Seminar: Human Nature Under Captialism

Think about the wide range of lives people lead today. Financial traders, stay-at-home parents, tech entrepreneurs, slum dwellers, corporate office drones, migrant workers, indebted college students. Our identities, aspirations, and anxieties are reflections of a capitalist system that has always relied on claims to what it means to be human. In this course we treat capitalism not as an abstraction for political debate but as a social force shaping the human lives and the planet. Departing from a conception of human nature not as fixed and universal but as formed by the totality of social relations, we explore how capital shapes human needs, desires, and relations to each other and the world.

Credits: 2.00
Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Canceled

AS.070.135 - Freshman Seminar: Human Nature Under Capitalism

Think about the wide range of lives people lead today. Financial traders, stay-at-home parents, tech entrepreneurs, slum dwellers, corporate office drones, migrant workers, indebted college students. Our identities, aspirations, and anxieties are reflections of a capitalist system that has always relied on claims to what it means to be human. In this course we treat capitalism not as an abstraction for political debate but as a social force shaping the human lives and the planet. Departing from a conception of human nature not as fixed and universal but as formed by the totality of social relations, we explore how capital shapes human needs, desires, and relations to each other and the world.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.070.210 - Trauma: institutions, violence, and everyday life

How are catastrophe and forms of everyday violence responded to in the clinic, law, in publicity, and in the domestic? In this course, we ask how trauma discourse has transformed institutional responses to violence. We will engage such issues as humanitarian intervention, rape and the law, the use of trigger warnings on college campuses, the clinical description of trauma and its treatment. Through ethnography, fiction, and film, we explore how the subjective experience of violence moves beyond and pushes the limits of institutional discourses on trauma.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Han, Clara
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.070.210 - Trauma: institutions, violence, and everyday life

How are catastrophe and forms of everyday violence responded to in the clinic, law, in publicity, and in the domestic? In this course, we ask how trauma discourse has transformed institutional responses to violence. We will engage such issues as humanitarian intervention, rape and the law, the use of trigger warnings on college campuses, the clinical description of trauma and its treatment. Through ethnography, fiction, and film, we explore how the subjective experience of violence moves beyond and pushes the limits of institutional discourses on trauma.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Han, Clara
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.070.145 - Freshman Seminar: The Idea of America

This course takes an anthropological look at the idea of America and everyday American life. Relying on ethnographic studies, selected works of popular writing, as well as films and fiction, we will explore themes such as settlement and displacement, aspiration and advancement, racial and cultural difference.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Pandian, Anand
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.334 - Contemporary Anthropology

Students are invited to attend, for credit, the departmental research colloquium in anthropology. The colloquium meets most (but not all) Tuesday afternoons during the semester. Students are expected to attend and listen, encouraged to ask questions when they wish, and to write one brief reflection on contemporary trends in the field, based on what they have observed during these sessions.

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Pandian, Anand
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 4:00PM - 6:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.373 - Housing Matters

This course will collectively craft an anthropological critique of housing, both as a social concern and as an object of public policy and urban planning. As a key component of the structure and functioning of cities, housing is instrumental to urban governance, segregation, and citizenship, as well as to cultures of consumption and class formation, identities, solidarities and the imagination of alternative social orders. We will study several ethnographies to examine how the material and social effects of housing shape the politics of difference, rights, markets and property relations, consumption and activism in the US urban context.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.317 - Methods

This course aims to teach basic fieldwork skills: Choosing and entering a community; establishing contacts; learning to listen and to ask questions and locating archival material that might be relevant. It is a hands-on course that increases student familiarity with various neighborhoods such as the Arts District in Baltimore. Recommended Course Background: two or more prior courses in anthropology (not cross-listed courses). Course is a requirement for anthropology major.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro, Haeri, Niloofar
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.374 - What Does it Mean to be Religious?

What do we mean when we say that something or someone is “religious?” We unpack this question in a comparative approach, and pay special attention to the ways in which this term has been applied to the study of Islamic cultures and Muslim experience. Through an exploration of the categories of experience, creativity and the individual, we offer a more capacious way of imagining what it means to be religious.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar, Ziad, Homayra
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.100.421 - Sex, Law and Islam

ISIS, “virgins” in paradise, the sexual slavery of Yazidi women…. This course will use anthropological and historical studies to examine the long history of how rules and understandings about sex, sexuality, and gender have mattered in how people think about Islam.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Khan, Naveeda, Shepard, Todd
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.504 - Independent Study

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Guyer, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.389.303 - World of Things

The course introduces and applies new concepts about materials, and materiality to museum objects. It treats the museum as a site for investigating the relationship between people and things.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.508 - Directed Readings

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Degani, Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.070.506 - Directed Research

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Degani, Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.070.508 - Directed Readings

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Han, Clara
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.070.562 - Senior Essay - Spring

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Khan, Naveeda
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.070.419 - Logic of Anthropological Inquiry

Anthropology is an endeavor to think with the empirical richness of the world at hand, a field science with both literary and philosophical pretensions. This course grapples with the nature of anthropological inquiry, reading classic works in the discipline as well as contemporary efforts to reimagine its foundations. Required for anthropology majors.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Poole, Deborah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.465 - Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic Texts

What is the nature of anthropological concepts and what relations do they bear to concepts internal to a society? We invite students to think with key ideas from Hindu and Islamic traditions, asking if anthropological concepts are best seen as abstractions from the particular or as intertwined with ongoing lines of inquiry, say into the nature of the real and continual efforts to test it? Topics in ritual theory, grammar, aesthetics, translation, revelation, luminosity, figuration and the mythological among those to be considered.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena, Khan, Naveeda
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: F 2:00PM - 4:30PM
Status: Open

AS.100.365 - Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages

This course will treat the flourishing of culture and society in the High Middle Ages (11-14th centuries). Topics covered include the emergence of feudal society and literature, the economic, social and cultural revival of Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries, the Renaissance of the twelfth century and the growth of scholasticism and the University, and the development of feudal monarchies in England and France..

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Status: Open

AS.070.562 - Senior Essay - Spring

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.070.552 - Internship - Spring

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.070.552 - Internship - Spring

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.100.365 - Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages

This course will treat the flourishing of culture and society in the High Middle Ages (11-14th centuries). Topics covered include the emergence of feudal society and literature, the economic, social and cultural revival of Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries, the Renaissance of the twelfth century and the growth of scholasticism and the University, and the development of feudal monarchies in England and France..

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Open

AS.070.504 - Independent Study

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Han, Clara
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.070.388 - Anthropology of the Biosciences

What is life? How do scientists shape and define this crucial concept, and for what uses? This course uses historical and anthropological accounts of the biological sciences to ask how the study of life is changing interactions with the world around and within us. In it, we will examine studies of synthetic biology, genetic engineering, genomics, biotechnology, biodiversity conservation, bioprospecting, medical biology, and artificial life. Guiding themes explore fundamental questions about biopower, biocapital, planetary change, bodies, and the nature of “life.” The course takes a global approach to the study of biology, including studies of bioscience and technology from the global South.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Labruto, Nicole
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.070.506 - Directed Research

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.271.405 - Energy and Politics

In the 21st century, energy supply and consumption are critical subjects for international politics, social development, and the future of the environment. Policies that determine energy supply and consumption come to being in complex institutional, national, and international contexts. This course will equip students with the necessary background to analyze energy policy issues and contribute to them in a meaningful manner. It also involves examination of wide-ranging debates over the switch to renewables, the use of unconventional energy sources, and the environmental consequences of energy choices.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ozden-Schilling, Canay
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.070.132 - Invitation to Anthropology

That the world is rapidly changing is so evident as to seem cliché to recognize it. But the question what it then means to be human requires continual investigation. This course introduces students to anthropology as a field of research and reflection. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding the world as it is and as it is becoming.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 2:45PM, M 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Open

AS.070.154 - Maps and Mapping

This course explores maps as cultural documents and ethnographic sites. Students will learn how cultural understandings of space, time, and the visible world shape cartographic conventions. Through mapping exercises we will explore how ethnographer can use maps to theorize the nature of political, cultural, and economic life.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.124 - Freshman Seminar: Climate Change - Treaties and Politics

With a focus on the United Nations organized Conference of Parties that negotiates global climate change policy, this course will ask, how are international environmental agreements made? To what extent are they responsive to scientific knowledge and empirical realities? What possibilities and exclusions are produced by this process for politics and activism? An important task will be to de-center the U.S. from these discussions to consider the issue from the perspective of the Global South, even as we interrogate what such a perspective means. We will draw on scientific reports, policy documents, recordings of negotiations and activist protests, media and expert commentaries and literary works to navigate this bed of thorns.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Khan, Naveeda
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.212 - Making of Minority in South Asia

This area studies course on modern South Asia will interrogate conceptions of nation, community, tradition and belonging across the region from the lens of minority groups, in order to equip students with the analytical tools with which to interrogate the politics of inclusion and exclusion.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Asif, Ghazal Ghazal Asif
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Open

AS.070.221 - Cityness: Anthropology of the Urban Experience

This course is an introduction to urban anthropology through the study of diverse "urban experiences," to explore how they are shaped by power relations as well as resistance. We will read about crowds and anonymity, finance and poverty, media and public space to understand how they change through the evolution of technology, shifts in capital investment and flows of migration. We will examine the scope and limitations of classical (Western) notions of foundational studies city life. We will also explore how the new notion of "cityness" captures better the variety of affects and dynamics of contemporary urban everyday life.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.267 - Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.140 - Anthropology of Food

This introductory course investigates what we eat and, as a consequence, who we are. By taking a cross-cultural perspective, students will examine the politics of food production, the values associated with food preparation, and the material and social dynamics of food consumption. Through readings, films, field trips, demonstrations, and tastings, the course offers an interdisciplinary and dynamic pedagogical approach to analyzing cooking and eating—activities central to daily life and social forms more broadly. Local- and global-level issues will be addressed as students explore histories, economics, social issues, and identity formation related to food.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Labruto, Nicole
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.273 - Ethnographies

What does it mean to translate the field onto the page? This course explores the craft of ethnography and its relationship to anthropological knowledge. Reading a series of classic and contemporary works, and engaging in our own writing experiments, we attend to the knotty problem of rendering lived experience, attending to narrative, voice, structure, and the relationship between description and analysis.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ozden-schilling, Thomas
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.132 - Invitation to Anthropology

That the world is rapidly changing is so evident as to seem cliché to recognize it. But the question what it then means to be human requires continual investigation. This course introduces students to anthropology as a field of research and reflection. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding the world as it is and as it is becoming.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 2:45PM, M 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.281 - Home and Belonging

In this course we will examine different conceptions and experiences of "home" through studies of domesticity, kinship and household in diverse cultural settings. Reading anthropological analysis of urban built environment and locality, we will explore the notions of home and homeland, as realms of care, intimacy and belonging yet also as sites of subjection, discrimination and gender/racial inequality.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Canceled

AS.070.295 - Conflict and Security in a Global World

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.295 - Conflict and Security in a Global World

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.503 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Guyer, Jane
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.505 - Directed Research-Fall

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.370 - Community and Political Mobilization in Latin America

This class explores the politics of migration, territory, environment and labor. Readings and class discussions will draw on anthropological studies of peasant, indigenous, and popular mobilizations in contemporary Latin America.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Poole, Deborah, Procupez, Valeria
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.561 - Senior Essay-Fall

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.487 - Romanticism and Anthropology

The word "romantic" has long carried negative connotations within anthropology meaning the tendency to idealize, exoticize, or seek out the irrational. Instead, through a focus on the themes of magic, art, myth, nature and creativity, we suggest that romantic philosophy has offered and continues to offer much of interest for contemporary anthropology. Drawing on select readings in philosophy and anthropology, we will explore the suppressed romantic legacy of anthropology. This is an undergraduate and graduate combined course. Recommended Course Background: Undergraduates have to have taken at least one anthropology course (any level) to register. Or else they need the permission of the instructor.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Khan, Naveeda
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.376 - Social Ecology

This course will explore social and cultural dimensions of contemporary ecological problems, thinking between ecological anthropology, environmental philosophy, and activist literature and media. It will be taught as a community-based learning course in partnership with the Center for Social Concern and a Baltimore environmental organization. Coursework will be organized on a collaborative studio basis and a project-based approach. Recommended Course Background: One prior course in either Anthropology or Environmental Studies.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Pandian, Anand
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.424 - Normal and Pathological

This seminar explores the shifting lines of the normal and the pathological and the constitution of disease in the complex of medicine, public health, and the social. Readings include the works of Canguilhem and Foucault, historical monographs and ethnographies. Students will have the opportunity to develop substantial research or review papers throughout the course of the seminar.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Greene, Jeremy, Han, Clara
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.336 - Enthnographic Perspectives on Brazil

This seminar offers an examination of Brazilian culture and politics through close readings of classic and contemporary ethnography. The course will track how anthropologists have approached the complexities and contradictions of Brazilian society. And, conversely, we investigate how studies in Brazil have prompted challenges to and generated innovations in anthropological thought.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.070.503 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Khan, Naveeda
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.551 - Internship - Fall

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Guyer, Jane
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.507 - Directed Readings

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.359 - Korean War

This course takes the Korean War as a site to both explore: 1) contemporary historical and political transformations in East Asia and globally and 2) the ways in which violence, catastrophic loss, and separation are woven into everyday life. It will explore the Korean War through film, fiction, historiography, and draw on comparative materials in anthropology

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Han, Clara
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.507 - Directed Readings

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Guyer, Jane
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.551 - Internship-Fall

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.561 - Senior Essay-Fall

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Guyer, Jane
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.561 - Senior Essay-Fall

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Goodfellow, Aaron
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.070.334 - Contemporary Anthropology

Students are invited to attend, for credit, the departmental research colloquium in anthropology. The colloquium meets most (but not all) Tuesday afternoons during the semester. Students are expected to attend and listen, encouraged to ask questions when they wish, and to write one brief reflection on contemporary trends in the field, based on what they have observed during these sessions.

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Pandian, Anand
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: T 4:00PM - 6:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.215.412 - Populism

What do Hugo Chávez, Marine Le Pen, and Donald Trump have in common? According to many from across the political spectrum, they are all populists. But what is populism, exactly, and how can it describe such disparate phenomena as left-wing social movements, xenophobic anti-immigrant policies, and economic redistribution? This advanced seminar will examine the history, culture, and political theory of populism. We will pay special attention to the resurgence of populism after the Great Recession and examine a number of cases from Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Seguin, Becquer D
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.505 - Directed Research-Fall

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Cervone, Emma
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.215.417 - Literature of the Great Recession

The Great Recession—sometimes called the financial crisis or the economic crisis of 2008—brought financial markets to a halt and created significant political turmoil across the North Atlantic. But its impact on culture, and literature especially, has often been ignored. This seminar will travel across Europe, from Dublin to Madrid, from London to Reykjavík in order to examine how literature has registered this most recent economic crisis. We will focus on how crisis is narrated and the ways in which literary works have managed to provide a voice for marginalized social, economic, and political demands.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Seguin, Becquer D
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Open

AS.070.380 - Slumworld: Life in informal Settlements

One quarter of the planet's urban population lives today in slums, shantytowns, favelas, chawls, colonias and other forms of rudimentary settlements (according to UN Habitat). Despite their prevalence throughout the world, these places are still depicted as spaces of informality and abjection, rather than as sites of emergence of innovative -even if disadvantaged-, makeshift ways of producing the city. This course will combine ethnographic and geographical literature, as well as works of fiction and film to explore the lives of squatters and slum-dwellers in many regions of the world and examine in what way their practices, forms of dwelling, sociality, conflict and cooperation are constitutive of the urban experience.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
Term: Fall 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Canceled