Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Picturizing Climate Change
AS.070.201 (01)

Climate change is represented in many pictures, such as those of tables, graphs, iconic photographs and filmic images. It materializes in many objects and qualities in our everyday lives, such as emissions, heat, solar grids and taxes. Artists attempt to picturize climate through photographs, installations and performance art. In this class we will examine these myriad representations, materializations and artistic efforts to see what ethical, political and aesthetic issues are at stake within them. We will ask to what concerns and desires does climate change give expression?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Khan, Naveeda
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Cityness: Anthropology and the Urban Experience
AS.070.221 (01)

This course is an introduction to urban anthropology through the study of diverse "urban experiences," to explore how they are shaped by power relations as well as resistance. We will read about crowds and anonymity, finance and poverty, media and public space to understand how they change through the evolution of technology, shifts in capital investment and flows of migration. We will examine the scope and limitations of classical (Western) notions of foundational studies city life. We will also explore how the notion of "cityness" better captures the variety of affects and dynamics of contemporary urban everyday life.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Locavores, Vegans, Freegans: Lifestyle Activism from an Anthropological Perspective
AS.070.256 (01)

From social media usage to popular public figures such as Greta Thunberg, we are inundated every day by messages on how we should change our daily habits to save the planet or consume certain brands to help particular causes. This course offers an anthropological perspective on such endeavors of lifestyle activism, broadly defined as the changing of one’s lifestyle and consumption habits to enact some form of social and political change. We will ask: How can we distinguish between lifestyle activism and non-activist concerns with lifestyle? What makes pursuing certain daily actions activist? What kind of self-cultivation and moral aspiration play into the transformation of habits? What does it take for daily habits to become a lifestyle movement that could enact larger and meaningful social and political change? Drawing from a variety of social and political contexts, we will explore topics such as voluntary simplicity, bicycling, zero waste, boycotts, and back-to-landers, while maintaining a larger focus on food and food activism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Abiral, Burge
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Methods
AS.070.317 (01)

This course aims to teach basic fieldwork skills: Choosing and entering a community; establishing contacts; learning to listen and to ask questions and locating archival material that might be relevant. It is a hands-on course that increases student familiarity with various neighborhoods such as the Arts District in Baltimore. Recommended Course Background: two or more prior courses in anthropology (not cross-listed courses). Course is a requirement for anthropology major.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Han, Clara, Pandian, Anand
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Latin America in a Fracturing World
AS.070.324 (01)

This course examines the multiple and overlapping crises afflicting Latin America today through an ethnographic lens. Featuring conversations with authors of recent work on the region’s most pressing issues, we will explore the contours of knowledge production itself under conditions of precarity and violence. Discussions will include the retrenchment of borders, migration crises, the state management of life and death, the resurgence of authoritarianism, food insecurity, and resource conflicts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro, Han, Clara
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Sheltering in Places: Architecture and Anthropology in Conversation
AS.070.330 (01)

What is the relation between social life and shelter? How do the kinds of buildings we move through shape our sense of what is important, beautiful, or possible? Why do some buildings feel good and others bad? And how do buildings evolve as people inhabit, repurpose, repair or degrade them over time? The course begins with philosophical reflections on spheres, shells, and containers in relation to childhood and memory. It then explores the long interdisciplinary conversation between architecture and anthropology, focusing on the social and cultural dimensions of built structures. Finally, it considers how architectural practice is responding to contemporary challenges of migration, pandemics, and climate change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Degani, Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Contemporary Anthropology
AS.070.334 (01)

Students are invited to attend, for credit, the departmental research colloquium in anthropology. The colloquium meets most (but not all) Tuesday afternoons during the semester. Students are expected to attend and listen, encouraged to ask questions when they wish, and to write one brief reflection on contemporary trends in the field, based on what they have observed during these sessions.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:00PM
  • Instructor: Pandian, Anand
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sustainable Design Studio
AS.070.402 (01)

Environmental justice issues require sustainable design solutions founded on social scientific practice, technical expertise, and solidarity with community partners. Building on theoretical and methodological knowledge gained in the Fall 2020 Sustainable Design course (AS.070.433/633), the Sustainable Design Studio will bring together students, members of Baltimore social justice organizations, and practitioners from a variety of disciplines to work in collaboration to research and design solutions to complex social-ecological problems faced by partner organizations. This studio class provides students with practical, project-based design experience through community collaboration. Instructor permission required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Labruto, Nicole
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 13/19
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Logic of Anthropological Inquiry
AS.070.419 (01)

Anthropology is an endeavor to think with the empirical richness of the world at hand, a field science with both literary and philosophical pretensions. This course grapples with the nature of anthropological inquiry, reading classic works in the discipline as well as contemporary efforts to reimagine its foundations. Required for anthropology majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro, Degani, Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic Texts
AS.070.465 (01)

What is the nature of anthropological concepts and what relations do they bear to concepts internal to a society? We invite students to think with key ideas from Hindu and Islamic traditions, asking if anthropological concepts are best seen as abstractions from the particular or as intertwined with ongoing lines of inquiry, say into the nature of the real and continual efforts to test it? Topics in ritual theory, grammar, aesthetics, translation, revelation, luminosity, figuration and the mythological among those to be considered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena, Khan, Naveeda
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (01)

This course will cover the period commonly known as the High Middle Ages, that is, the civilization of Western Europe in the period roughly from 1050 to 1350. . It is a period of exceptional creativity in the history of Western Europe and in medieval history specifically, a time when many of the most characteristic institutions of Europe came into being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/22
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (02)

This course will cover the period commonly known as the High Middle Ages, that is, the civilization of Western Europe in the period roughly from 1050 to 1350. . It is a period of exceptional creativity in the history of Western Europe and in medieval history specifically, a time when many of the most characteristic institutions of Europe came into being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 21/23
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Origins of Civilization: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
AS.130.214 (01)

One of the most significant transformations in human history was the “urban revolution” in which cities, writing, and social classes formed for the first time. In this course, we compare five areas where this development occurred: China, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, Egypt, and Mesoamerica (Mexico/Guatemala/Honduras/Belize). In each region, we review the physical setting, the archaeological and textual evidence, and the theories advanced to explain the rise (and eventual collapse) of these complex societies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Schwartz, Glenn M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 23/50
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC, NEAS-HISCUL

Cultures of Pilgrimage in Islam
AS.194.305 (01)

The hajj pilgrimage to Mecca is one of the pillars of Islam. But Muslims around the world also take part in many other pilgrimages, from the massive annual Shi’a pilgrimage to Karbala to the smaller ziyarat “visits” to Sufi saint shrines, to travel to centers of Islamic learning, to pilgrimage to isolated natural features like mountains, trees, valleys. What are the theologies that propel the act of travel in Islam? How are cities, architectures, economies shaped by these cultures? And how are these traditions affected by the wars and colonial projects that plague many Muslim-majority countries in the contemporary world? Readings in this course will draw from anthropology, philosophy, Islamic interpretive texts (tafsir), and travelogues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Roy, Arpan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Feminist and Queer Theory: Black Decolonial Feminisms in the Americas
AS.363.301 (01)

This course will use both historical and contemporary readings focusing on Black and decolonial feminisms as theory and praxis to reflect on the particular experiences of afro-descendants throughout the Americas.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Estrella, Amarilys
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

What Does it Mean to be Religious? Experience, Creativity, and the Individual
AS.365.104 (04)

What do we mean when we say that something or someone is “religious?” We unpack this question in a comparative perspective, but will pay special attention to the ways in which this term has been applied to the study of Islamic cultures and Muslim experience. Through an exploration of the categories of experience, creativity and the individual, we offer a more capacious way of imagining what it means to be religious.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar, Ziad, Homayra
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Anthropology of Home
AS.365.104 (07)

In this course, we will examine different conceptions and experiences of ""home"" through studies of domesticity, kinship and household in diverse cultural settings. Reading anthropological analysis of urban built environment and locality, we will explore the notions of home and homeland, as realms of care, intimacy and belonging yet also as sites of subjection, discrimination and gender/racial inequality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.070.201 (01)Picturizing Climate ChangeTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMKhan, Naveeda ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.070.221 (01)Cityness: Anthropology and the Urban ExperienceTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMProcupez, Valeria 
AS.070.256 (01)Locavores, Vegans, Freegans: Lifestyle Activism from an Anthropological PerspectiveTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAbiral, Burge ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.070.317 (01)MethodsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMHan, Clara, Pandian, AnandMergenthaler 266
AS.070.324 (01)Latin America in a Fracturing WorldW 1:30PM - 4:00PMAngelini, Alessandro, Han, Clara INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.330 (01)Sheltering in Places: Architecture and Anthropology in ConversationT 1:30PM - 4:00PMDegani, Michael 
AS.070.334 (01)Contemporary AnthropologyT 4:00PM - 6:00PMPandian, Anand 
AS.070.402 (01)Sustainable Design StudioF 1:30PM - 4:00PMLabruto, Nicole ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.070.419 (01)Logic of Anthropological InquiryM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAngelini, Alessandro, Degani, Michael ARCH-RELATE
AS.070.465 (01)Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic TextsF 1:30PM - 4:00PMDas, Veena, Khan, Naveeda INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.100.365 (01)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHodson 110HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (02)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHodson 110HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.130.214 (01)The Origins of Civilization: A Cross-Cultural PerspectiveTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchwartz, Glenn M ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC, NEAS-HISCUL
AS.194.305 (01)Cultures of Pilgrimage in IslamT 1:30PM - 4:00PMRoy, Arpan INST-GLOBAL
AS.363.301 (01)Feminist and Queer Theory: Black Decolonial Feminisms in the AmericasTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMEstrella, Amarilys INST-PT
AS.365.104 (04)What Does it Mean to be Religious? Experience, Creativity, and the IndividualTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMHaeri, Niloofar, Ziad, Homayra 
AS.365.104 (07)The Anthropology of HomeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMProcupez, Valeria