Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Death and the State: Archaeologies of Governance in the Americas
AS.010.452 (01)

This seminar explores the relationship between death and governance, with a focus on the archaeology and art history of the Americas. Our readings will examine key social and anthropological theories of death, questioning whether and how they might apply to the archaeological record through in-class archaeological case studies. Themes include interactions with ancestors and spirits, records of political struggles and war, questions about race and ethnicity, incidents of mass killings, debates on power and sovereignty, crime and punishment, and the archaeology of institutional care, science and medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Rossi, Franco
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, HART-NW, ARCH-ARCH, MSCH-HUM

Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and Beyond
AS.060.157 (01)

This course provides an introduction to the texts and rhetoric of the movement that abolished slavery in the Caribbean. Among other topics, we examine: how the formerly enslaved represented their experiences of slavery; how abolitionism emerged across the West Indies, Cuba, and Haiti; and the techniques artists used to imagine radical, post-slavery worlds. Authors include: Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Esteban Montejo, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, and Aimé Césaire (all texts will be available in English).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Loker, Evan
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (01)

The question what it means to be human requires continual investigation. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding humanity in its diverse manifestations. This course familiarizes students with anthropological concepts and methods, and engages in critical analysis of a broad range of subjects including language, exchange, class, race, gender, kinship, sexuality, religion, and capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
  • Room: Bloomberg 274
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/23
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (02)

The question what it means to be human requires continual investigation. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding humanity in its diverse manifestations. This course familiarizes students with anthropological concepts and methods, and engages in critical analysis of a broad range of subjects including language, exchange, class, race, gender, kinship, sexuality, religion, and capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
  • Room: Bloomberg 274
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/22
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI

Freshman Seminar: Urban Citizenship
AS.070.221 (01)

In our present "urban age," the city appears as the privileged framework to claim citizenship rights. This demand, however, clashes with issues of urban renewal and development, security and circulation, as well as conditions of stark inequality that relegate vast sectors of the urban population around the globe to informality and precarious residence, without access to adequate healthcare, sanitary services and amenities, or secure housing tenure. This course examines the intricacies of the notion of "urban citizenship" and how the "right to the city" is imagined and demanded in struggles for belonging and inclusion in cities throughout the world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Hinduism and Ethics: The Epics
AS.070.239 (01)

We will read sections of the two major epics Ramayana and Mahabharata to see how issues of morality and ethics are posed in these texts and the disputations around these issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena
  • Room: Bloomberg 168
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Power and Place in the Segregated City
AS.070.250 (01)

Identifying residential segregation as a principle driver of racial inequity, the Fair Housing Act of 1968 sought to end housing discrimination and advance the racial integration American cities. Fifty years after this landmark legislation, however, American cities are in most cases more segregated than ever before. New and urgent demands for racial justice, coalescing in transnational movements like Black Lives Matter, have brought a renewed focus onto the deep and abiding social harms wrought by decades of urban segregation. Drawing on anthropological and sociological scholarship on cities both in and outside the United States, this course will examine the social forces that drive segregation, reify boundaries in urban space, and reproduce persistent power asymmetries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Adams, Nathaniel Johnson
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran
AS.070.267 (01)

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST

Ethnographies
AS.070.273 (01)

What does it mean to translate the field onto the page? This course explores the craft of ethnography and its relationship to anthropological knowledge. Reading a series of classic and contemporary works, and engaging in our own writing experiments, we attend to the knotty problem of rendering lived experience, attending to narrative, voice, structure, and the relationship between description and analysis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Pandian, Anand
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Conflict and Security in a Global World
AS.070.295 (01)

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Degani, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Conflict and Security in a Global World
AS.070.295 (02)

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Degani, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Reverberations Of The Korean War
AS.070.332 (01)

This course will takes the reverberations of the Korean War to examine the ways in which catastrophic violence is absorbed into and corrodes social life. Particular attention is paid to the transnational nature of conflict, how boundaries around peace and war are established, and how recent scholarly and artistic work on the Korean War has critically engaged dominant frameworks of memory and trauma. Readings will draw from fiction, ethnography, historiography and will also include film. This course also draws from the public syllabus on Ending the Korean War.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Han, Clara
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Contemporary Anthropology
AS.070.334 (01)

Students are invited to attend, for credit, the departmental research colloquium in anthropology. The colloquium meets most (but not all) Tuesday afternoons during the semester. Students are expected to attend and listen, encouraged to ask questions when they wish, and to write one brief reflection on contemporary trends in the field, based on what they have observed during these sessions. Prerequisite: Students must have completed one Anthropology course previously.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:00PM
  • Instructor: Pandian, Anand
  • Room: Mergenthaler 439
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Common Ground: Shared Resources, Social Economies
AS.070.342 (01)

This course explores the idea and practice of the commons through various sites and objects (money, work, natural resources, urban land, knowledge and culture, etc.). We will examine the promise and limitations of local, grassroots social and economic forms of organization that propose alternatives to the market economy. Focusing on workers, consumers and housing cooperatives; community currencies; urban gardens; self-help associations; fair trade organizations and knowledge networks; we will enquire how these social economies propose autonomous forms of living together, and sharing resources, property and labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Sustainable Design
AS.070.433 (01)

Sustainable design involves the development of socially engaging and ecologically sensitive interventions and alternatives, a task both social and technical in nature. Through interdisciplinary readings and collaborative workshops in social science, environmental engineering, and planning and design, this seminar focuses on both theoretical and practical dimensions of this challenge. The first of a two-course sequence, to be followed by a studio practicum in the spring semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Pandian, Anand
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

New War/ Civil Conflicts/ Policing
AS.070.435 (01)

This is an advanced course in which we will interrogate the boundaries between war, civil conflict and techniques of policing. Students should be prepared to work through texts of an interdisciplinary character.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Rumors, Conspiracy Theories And Disinformation
AS.070.472 (01)

Our present is said to be rife with more rumors, conspiracy theories and disinformation than ever before. Is this moment so different from previous, historical moments of crisis? Haven't these modes of expression always been present, albeit at the margins of the political order? What does it say about knowledge to have multiple “regimes of truth” (Foucault)? How does a new media landscape based in algorithmic modularity, and particularly social media, change the set up from an old analogue media economy? This course, co-taught by an, a literary theorist, and a media theorist, aims to provide a diversity of theoretical and methodological perspectives to help us examine the current state of reality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Khan, Naveeda, Tobias, Rochelle, Wegenstein, Bernadette
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): MLL-GERM, MSCH-HUM

Science Studies and Medical Humanities: Theory and Methods
AS.145.219 (01)

The knowledge and practices of science and medicine are not as self-evident as they may appear. When we observe, what do we see? What counts as evidence? How does evidence become fact? How do facts circulate and what are their effects? Who is included in and excluded from our common-sense notions of science, medicine, and technology? This course will introduce students to central theoretical concerns in Science and Technology Studies and the Medical Humanities, focusing on enduring problematics that animate scholars. In conjunction with examinations of theoretical bases, students will learn to evaluate the methodological tools used in different fields in the humanities to study the production and circulation of scientific knowledge and the structures of medical care and public health. This problem-centered approach will help students understand and apply key concepts and approaches in critical studies of science, technology, and medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Labruto, Nicole
  • Room: Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Never Forget: Muslims, Islamophobia, and Dissent after 9/11
AS.194.202 (01)

In partnership with the social justice organization Justice for Muslims Collective, this community-engaged course and oral history project will explore how diverse Muslim communities navigated and contested belonging and political and cultural agency amidst state-sponsored violence and national debates on race, gender, citizenship and national security after 9/11 and during the ongoing War on Terror. Through history, ethnography, first-person narratives, film, fiction, and online resources, students will learn about the impact of 9/11 on American Muslim communities. This includes cultural and political resistance to imperialism, racism, and Islamophobia as well as to intersectional inequities within Muslim communities that were intensified in the context of Islamophobia. Students will learn about community activism and organizing from JMC, and complete a participatory action research project with the organization. This project is an oral history archive that will address gaps in the documentation of movement histories when it comes to early organizing against War on Terror policies by Muslim communities and communities racialized or perceived as Muslim. Students will be trained to record stories of resistance among leaders who organized and responded at the local and national-level in the Greater Washington region, to support the building of an archive that will shape a wide variety of future organizing and advocacy efforts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.452 (01)Death and the State: Archaeologies of Governance in the AmericasW 4:30PM - 7:00PMRossi, FrancoGilman 50HART-ANC, HART-NW, ARCH-ARCH, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.157 (01)Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and BeyondTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLoker, EvanLatrobe 120INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.132 (01)Invitation to AnthropologyM 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroBloomberg 274ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.070.132 (02)Invitation to AnthropologyM 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroBloomberg 274ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.070.221 (01)Freshman Seminar: Urban CitizenshipTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMProcupez, ValeriaMergenthaler 426
AS.070.239 (01)Hinduism and Ethics: The EpicsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMDas, VeenaBloomberg 168
AS.070.250 (01)Power and Place in the Segregated CityTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAdams, Nathaniel JohnsonHodson 301
AS.070.267 (01)Culture, Religion and Politics in IranW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHaeri, NiloofarSmokler Center 213INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.070.273 (01)EthnographiesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMPandian, AnandMergenthaler 426
AS.070.295 (01)Conflict and Security in a Global WorldT 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PMDegani, MichaelGilman 50INST-IR
AS.070.295 (02)Conflict and Security in a Global WorldT 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PMDegani, MichaelGilman 50INST-IR
AS.070.332 (01)Reverberations Of The Korean WarW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHan, ClaraGilman 134INST-CP
AS.070.334 (01)Contemporary AnthropologyT 4:00PM - 6:00PMPandian, AnandMergenthaler 439
AS.070.342 (01)Common Ground: Shared Resources, Social EconomiesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMProcupez, Valeria INST-ECON
AS.070.433 (01)Sustainable DesignW 1:30PM - 4:00PMPandian, AnandMergenthaler 426ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.070.435 (01)New War/ Civil Conflicts/ PolicingF 1:30PM - 4:00PMDas, VeenaGreenhouse 113
AS.070.472 (01)Rumors, Conspiracy Theories And DisinformationF 1:30PM - 4:30PMKhan, Naveeda, Tobias, Rochelle, Wegenstein, BernadetteBloomberg 176MLL-GERM, MSCH-HUM
AS.145.219 (01)Science Studies and Medical Humanities: Theory and MethodsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMLabruto, NicoleBloomberg 172MSCH-HUM
AS.194.202 (01)Never Forget: Muslims, Islamophobia, and Dissent after 9/11T 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, Homayra INST-GLOBAL