Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

AS.070.126 - Photography in Anthropology

We will examine historical uses of photographs, critiques of them and more recent creative uptakes of photography in anthropology. We will learn from the use of photographs by anthropologists in the Hopkins department. We will also undertake independent projects. Students will learn to critically engage and mobilize images through the history of its use in anthropology.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Khan, Naveeda, Poole, Deborah
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.070.132 - Invitation to Anthropology

Click. The screen that brings you last night’s Instagrams and celebrity gossip also flashes glimpses of melting icecaps and burning rubble. These are complex times for human beings, both exciting and unsettling. This course introduces anthropology as a way of reflecting on the challenges of contemporary life around the globe, focusing on themes such as migration, warfare, ecology, inequality, and addiction.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Pandian, Anand
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.070.143 - Anthropology of Markets and Capitalism

Capitalism is built on social and cultural processes. In this course, we explore the culture of capitalism across diverse settings — a fish market in Tokyo, an investment bank in Wall Street, and the organ donation economy in China, among many others. We ask what motivates the makers of markets today, as well as their critics.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Open

AS.070.267 - Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.132 - Invitation to Anthropology

Click. The screen that brings you last night’s Instagrams and celebrity gossip also flashes glimpses of melting icecaps and burning rubble. These are complex times for human beings, both exciting and unsettling. This course introduces anthropology as a way of reflecting on the challenges of contemporary life around the globe, focusing on themes such as migration, warfare, ecology, inequality, and addiction.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Pandian, Anand
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.070.237 - Conflict and Environment

How do conflicts in and over environments shape our understandings of identity and belonging? Violence, resource loss, and resettlement may shape landscapes through physical infrastructures or sites of extraction, but they also live on in memory, art, and other social practices. From the fencing of the American west to attempts to save Andean glaciers through the legal recognition of “earth beings,” this course examines the many ways environments and conflict co-shape one another.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ozden-schilling, Thomas
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 3:00PM - 5:20PM
Status: Open

AS.070.251 - Aliens, iPads, and Neurotribes: An Introduction to the Anthropology of Autism

This course is an overview of the emerging anthropology of autism. It surveys the history of the autism diagnosis -- from its original formulation at Johns Hopkins in 1943 to its rapid expansion into a "spectrum" condition in the late 1990s -- and the ways in which social scientists of different disciplines have tried to analyze the role of social and cultural factors in its evolution. The course also looks at a range of ethnographic studies that have asked what it means be autistic in today's world.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Platzer, David Lawrence
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.070.281 - Home and Belonging

In this course we will examine different conceptions and experiences of "home" through studies of domesticity, kinship and household in diverse cultural settings. Reading anthropological analysis of urban built environment and locality, we will explore the notions of home and homeland, as realms of care, intimacy and belonging yet also as sites of subjection, discrimination and gender/racial inequality.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.295 - Conflict and Security in a Global World

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.273 - Ethnographies

What does it mean to translate the field onto the page? This course explores the craft of ethnography and its relationship to anthropological knowledge. Reading a series of classic and contemporary works, and engaging in our own writing experiments, we attend to the knotty problem of rendering lived experience, attending to narrative, voice, structure, and the relationship between description and analysis.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ozden-schilling, Thomas
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.070.359 - Korean War

This course takes the Korean War as a site to both explore: 1) contemporary historical and political transformations in East Asia and globally and 2) the ways in which violence, catastrophic loss, and separation are woven into everyday life. It will explore the Korean War through film, fiction, historiography, and draw on comparative materials in anthropology

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Han, Clara
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.070.372 - Religion and Media

This course examines the ways in which conventional and non-conventional media recreate or transform religious experience in modern life. Increasingly, religion is experienced not only in sacred spaces and as ritual prescriptions, but also through the information that is disseminated through radio, TV, and the Internet, as well as in consumer culture and political speeches. Beginning with this proposition that our ideas about religion are shaped not only by historical and scriptural legacies, but as well as by material practices and other sundry conditions of mediation, of which our present times supply many, we will reexamines how questions of revelation, belief, spirituality, ethereality, and ritual practice are constituted by these irreducible ways, thus complicating the neat separation of religion and secularism, or, for that matter, religion and culture.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Bagaria, Swayam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.380 - Slumworld: Life in informal Settlements

One quarter of the planet's urban population lives today in slums, shantytowns, favelas, chawls, colonias and other forms of rudimentary settlements (according to UN Habitat). Despite their prevalence throughout the world, these places are still depicted as spaces of informality and abjection, rather than as sites of emergence of innovative -even if disadvantaged-, makeshift ways of producing the city. This course will combine ethnographic and geographical literature, as well as works of fiction and film to explore the lives of squatters and slum-dwellers in many regions of the world and examine in what way their practices, forms of dwelling, sociality, conflict and cooperation are constitutive of the urban experience.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.436 - Vulnerability

Many in the contemporary world live in states of acute vulnerability. In this course, we will look closely at situations like forced displacement, experience of poverty and injury, environmental devastation, and the politics of social protest. Thinking with ethnography, feminist philosophy, fiction, and film, we will explore whether vulnerability may be taken as a condition to live with rather than one to overcome at any cost.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Pandian, Anand
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.070.551 - Internship-Fall

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.503 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Guyer, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.551 - Internship - Fall

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Guyer, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.465 - Concepts and the Real in Hindu & Islamic Studies

We will examine historical uses of photographs, critiques of them and more recent creative uptakes of photography in anthropology. We will learn from the use of photographs by anthropologists in the Hopkins department. We will also undertake independent projects. Students will learn to critically engage and mobilize images through the history of its use in anthropology.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena, Khan, Naveeda
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Canceled

AS.070.505 - Directed Research-Fall

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.136.101 - Introduction To Archaeology

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schwartz, Glenn M
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Open

AS.070.561 - Senior Essay-Fall

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.561 - Senior Essay-Fall

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Guyer, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.561 - Senior Essay-Fall

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Goodfellow, Aaron
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.505 - Directed Research-Fall

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Cervone, Emma
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.507 - Directed Readings

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Guyer, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.503 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Khan, Naveeda
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.215.406 - Novelist Intellectuals

What does a novelist’s op-ed about economics have to do with her literary writing? In what ways does a fiction writer’s essays on the environment inform how we read her novels? What happens when we find the political opinions of a writer objectionable? This undergraduate seminar will consider what the Spanish writer Francisco Ayala termed “novelist intellectuals,” that is, literary writers who actively participate in a society’s public sphere. Considering writers from Madrid to New York, from London to Buenos Aires, we will ask how one should hold a novelist’s fictional and non-fictional writings in the balance and explore ways of reading that allow us to consider the public intellectual side and the aesthetic side of a novelist together.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Seguin, Becquer D
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.507 - Directed Readings

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.594 - Internship-Anthropology

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Khan, Naveeda
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.260 - Healing and Power

What is health? Should it be defined by opposition to illness and disease? The course explores how the process of healing unfolds, connecting individual experiences and life stories to the study of broad social processes: transitions from war and violent domination, humanitarianism, epidemics or economic crisis. What role does memory play within healing? What is the relation between the body in pain and the body politic? What are the resonances between the legal and the lethal? Interactions between doctors and patients, as well as states and populations.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Obarrio, Juan M
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings: TWThF 9:00AM - 12:00PM
Status: Canceled

AS.070.236 - On Gardens and Gardening

This course will explore the diverse meanings different forms of gardens (botanical, royal, and urban gardens, guerrilla gardening, horticulture etc.) have come to acquire historically in a variety of settings, including outer space. Drawing from literature, geography, and history, students will develop an anthropological approach to studying gardens and gardening through topics such as aesthetics, colonialism, emotions, nutrition, human-nature relationships, and resistance. Readings will be complemented by films and field trips.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Abiral, Burge
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings: MWF 1:00PM - 4:00PM
Status: Canceled

AS.070.254 - Religion and Mass Media

Focusing on Hinduism, Islam and Christianity in various media from South Asia, the Middle East and North America, we will consider the following questions: How is religion represented in and through popular forms of mass media - cinema, television and audiotapes/discs? How does mass media shape religious publics?

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ibrahim, Amrita
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 12:00PM
Status: Canceled

AS.070.594 - Internship-Anthropology

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Poole, Deborah
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.596 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Guyer, Jane
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.595 - Directed Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.206 - States of Terror: Imagining and Managing Threat

How do we come to imagine particular individuals, communities, and groups as threats? What is at stake in such namings and classifications? In this course, we will explore the ways in which we come to know the Other and what such knowledge is productive of. With a special focus on works by anthropologists, we will consider the mobilization of affect, governmentality, the discourse on terrorism, and border regimes.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Banahi, Mariam
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings: MWF 1:00PM - 4:00PM
Status: Canceled

AS.070.595 - Directed Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Obarrio, Juan M
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.596 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.070.255 - Nonviolence and the Politics of Resistance

This course will provide a forum for students to explore how principles of nonviolence relate to the politics of resistance. Nonviolent resistance has been significant both in the United States and other nations, where the concept has affected politics and relations between groups for generations until the present day. The syllabus for this course will cover and consider examples of the Civil Rights movement, the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, Gandhi's passive resistance, and others.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Chase, Mikaela Ondine
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings: MWF 12:00PM - 3:00PM
Status: Canceled